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. are unemployment checks going to stimulus the economy. house minority leader nancy peel pole said yes. >> it is more injected by unemployment insurance. >> okay, to get this number down, get the number of people on these lines that you are looking at up. how is that going to work. i am cheryl casone and welcome to cashin in . joining us is trace yejohn and christian dorsey . welcome to all of you. tracey, benefits the best form of stimulus, really, you agree with that? >> the only thing that jobless stimulus benefit is apathy it is it easier to stay at home and collect a check than work at mcdonalds. we are so lazy these days, take 99 weeks was a freebey. we saw it with the hostess union guys. we rather take unemployment than take consessions. >> wayne, the benefits are so crucial we should extend them and not keep them in place but give more of a hand out to the unemployment for the reasons of saving the economy. >> i have a better idea. have everybody stand on the corner with a bag of cash. it is idiotic and nancy pelosi, she is a -- econist. that is it a guy who drives the car by l
this one and that is good for the american economy. >> we look back republican senator rand paul from the state of kentucky. senator paul, welcome, as always. i want to ask you about the fiscal cliff, the state of play. there's revenues on the table. there's tax rate increases on the table. i don't know if there's spending on the table. what's your thinking prigt now? >> that it's a really, really bad idea to raise taxes. if you want your economy to grow, you should do the opposite. we have to cut taxes. that's how i'd fix the economy. leave more money in the private sector. the president is adamant about raising taxes and he's dead wrong. >> there are some people saying we need a deal to avoid a huge tax increase but year end that would throw us into recession. just a thought, would you compromise in terms of let's say a smaller tax rate increase -- let's say the top rate goes to 37% instead of 40%, maybe the threshold goads es to $500,000 $750,000 rather than $250,000? does that interest you? >> no. but what about means testing for entitlement. why don't we say the rich get less soc
is good for the economy. if they have different suggestions and want to go further in some areas, they should lay it out to us. >> you say they are in a hard spot, what do you mean? >> they are trying to figure out how to find a way to support things that they know they are going to have to do that will be very hard for them. you've heard them for the first time in two decades now acknowledge that they are willing to have revenues go up as part of the balanced plan. that's a it good first step but they have to tell us what they are willing to do on rates and revenues. and they have to tell us on the spending side if they want to go beyond where we are or do it differently and they have to tell us what makes sense to them. what we can't do, chris; try to figure out what works for them. >> the president campaigned for re-election on the idea of a, quote, balanced approach, end quote, to deficit reduction. a mixture of tax increases and spending cuts. here's the plan that the republicans say you presented to them this week. >> i can tell you what i presented if it would be helpful.
think the ramifications for the economy are too significant. i think we're watching whatever you want to call it, all of the politics playing out, but i still think in the end we'll get a last minute deal. >> i agree. and i think even though the sides are far apart, you have things on the table now. so you can say you're here at 800, 1.6, you kind of -- it gets you somewhere close. somebody will try to say 1.3 versus 1.1, but if you see publicly what they're stating and hopefully privately other things are going on, but it will get done, but it will be very slow. >> john boehner with the proposal he put on the table, i did see commentary from some of the far right saying this is not an acceptable proposal. even his proposal is not acceptable. i did see comment it ter that came through. my question is does the president now have to alienate some of his far left base in order to reach a compromise. >> i think you'll see both of them have to actually bring the parties together. because you won't get everybody happy. some of the people who got voted on the ticket side, no, never. but it w
minutes away. count do countdown is on. the economy probably added about 80,000 jobs last month. reuters consensus is a little higher at 93,000. the unemployment rate expected to hold steady at 7.9% and economists say the slow down in nonfarm payrolls will reflect the effect of sandy. joining us this hour is bank of america merrill lynch global research senior research economist michelle mire and we'll talk through everything that's been happening through jobs and what to expect. but first, there is a developing story. an earthquake off the northeast coast of japan triggered a tsunami warning. the warning has been lifted, but it was a 7.3 quake. so far no reports of any injuries or damage. it was for the same area devastated by an earthquake and tsunami back in march of last year. we will continue to bring you any developments. in the meantime, steve has some of the morning's top other stories. >> let's start with the markets. asian stocks rallying to 2012 highs overnight. the nikkei edging lower after hitting a se hitting hitting a seven month closing high yesterday. european trading, s
referred to things that will help make the economy stronger in the short-term and let me explain why we proposed that. what we are suggesting is that we work to rebuild the country's infrastructure, rather than putting it off, doesn't say just to put it off and extend unemployment insurance benefits and help make it easier for americans to refinance mortgages and, tax incentives for business investment and proposed how to do that in a fiscally responsible way we can afford to pay for and matched those proposals, with spending savings that, together as part of the plan, get us down to the point where we stabilize our debt and that is the critical test. >> chris: let me drill down into the spending part of the equation, here they're increases, spending increase as you are proposing. $150 billion, in stimulus, public works projects over several years. a $30 billion extension of unemployment insurance, for one year. extension of payroll tax cuts, mortgage relief, deferral, of automatic cuts for doctors and medicare. here are the spending cuts. unspecified savings from nonentitlement program
. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow-walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: not surprisingly, democratic house leader nancy pelosi had precisely the opposite explanation for what is behind this stalemate. she says republicans simply echoing the white house are going to have to buckle on the issue of the top rates. >> the only obstacle standing in the way of middle income tax relief are the republicans unwillingness to ask the top 2% to pay their fair share. >> but tyler, as you suggested, this is all a work in progress. the thing we cannot see that is not visible to the public or to the press is what's going on behind the scenes. staff discussions resumed yesterday. don't know how fruitful. i haven't gotten much of a signal from people on either side that a deal is close, but they're work rg at it and sometimes these situations can turn around quickly. >> john, what of the reports today that perhaps at some point the republicans in the house and in the senate would go along with the idea of extending the bus
that there may be some more demand coming for the metal from china and the u.s. as well. as both of our economies begin to churn a little more than expected. the top two copper-consuming countries. >> and following auto sales today, a number of derivatives plays hitting 52-week highs. cooper tire and rubber, genuine parts and carmax taking a hit in today's session. david: all right. and we told you about that breaking news on jpmorgan whale trader, a $5 billion loss for the company. the senate has been investigating. peter barnes with the latest on that investigation. peter? >> reporter: well, that's right, david. the senate, a senate investigation subcommittee has questioned more than 80 people in its probe of $5.8 billion in trading losses in may by jpmorgan chase, the london whale trading losses, according to two people familiar with the investigation. now, according to the sources the people -- according to one of the sources, the people include current and former jpmorgan employees as you would expect. now, reports of this probe first -@surfaced in the fall. now we can report that investigat
the white house. reports indicate that the president has adopted a strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president that the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we will continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has a spending3 problem, not a revenue problem. if the president does not agree with our proposal, i believe he has an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own. we are ready and eager to talk to the president about such plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week, can you characterize that call. also, it has to be increases in rates for the wealthy or no deal. >> the phone call was pleasant, but more of the same. it is time for the president to be serious and come back with a counter offer. [inaudible question] >> the risk the president wants us to take, increasing tax rates will hit many small businesses that produce 60-70% of the new jobs in our country. that is the
to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> the house speaker had nothing of substance to say about this week's phone conversation with the president. >> the phone call was pleasant, but was just more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday, just more of the same. it's time for the president if he's serious to come back to us with a counteroffer. >> boehner says the president is not being a helpful negotiator, even though the president apparently designed the negotiating sessions at boehner's request. according to "the new york times," boehner insisted the talks include only himself and the president of the united states. boehner wanted senate democrats and nancy pelosi out of the discussions. democratic senator dick durbin told the times this is now the speaker and the president working this through. democratic leaders say they are satisfied with the briefings that they continue to receive. nancy pelosi seems perfectly happy putting pressure on the republicans. >> why are w
that's what he's trying to do. it's hard to see where the upside is for the president if the economy slips into recession, talking about 2013 having no growth would be horrible. >> yeah, so, it's a little hard to see what the game is. as kim was mentioning, the president wants these tax increases. it seems to me we're going to go through this sort of scorpion dance the rest of the year. what did the president campaign on? what was the one thing, i think most people would say he campaigned on, that's raising tax rates on the wealthiest, the two top rates, that's the thing i think is on the table and-- >>, but the republicans put that on the table. >> and the republicans put that on the table the a through deductions and-- >> yeah. but they're willing to put that on the table. the question is, what does the president then give republicans in return, if anything? >> well, i think that's what the republicans position should be. say we have committed what you campaigned on. if you're not willing to talk about reducing spending, they are we're not going to be able to do a deal with you. an
, these guys don't think that the economy is going to suffer that much. they think they will take credit. that is how they think. talk about social engineering. what happened to the jack kemp argument. what about empowerment. john f kennedy had the same thing. i don't want to bring some down and some up. i want to bring everybody up. where is that argument? >> and jack kennedy said, if you want to raise tax revenues, you must cut tax rates. the opposite of what obama said. they don't believe it. they want a western european style cradle to grave state. they want to make sure that they preserve it and they want to pay for it. the middle class is going to be nailed and they are going to blame republicans and they are going to have to go back to get more money. isn't it mostly true, taxing the rich, and you poll the whole electric. the middle income people believe they are going to be next. middle income say you are not going to get enough money there. they are going to hit me and there is going to be a carbon tax. president obama needs to expand the government. i wish the majority of the m
savings as part of that and invest in things that matter to the american economy. we think we can do that. we have a good chance to do it now. it's important that we do it. i think we're going to get there. >> given tough talk over the weekend, why aren't we waking up to down numbers, red arrows? >> europe is terrific. bond rates are phenomenal. a great run. china numbers are better. i think that there's a lot of people who feel like doug cast does who writes with me with a piece in "the new york times" saying that -- >> most stuff is nontaxable accounts any way. most stocks that people won't be as motivated to sell as people think. of course that doesn't necessarily deal with the increase in payroll taxes and the whole recession side of it. it does deal with the stock market side in terms of selling. >> why not say, listen, fiscal cliff, i have to cut numbers. i have to cut guidance. i think many ceos will cut guidance because of the possibility that the amt is going to -- this alternative minimum tax, people don't know they have to write a check for $3,500 at the end of the year. once y
two acquisitions. plains exploration and mcmoran exploration. >>> concerns over the u.s. economy as adp misses estimates. the blame goes to superstorm sandy. goldman says the party is officially over for gold. >> starbucks at an investors conference will add 1,500 stores in the u.s. over the next five years. wait until you hear what they said about china. >> a big day in media. pandora ceo joins us live later this morning as the stock fell nearly 20% on weak guidance and netflix signs a big exclusive with disney. how much are they having to pay up for that? >>> let's deal with this big deal. as i've been telling you we'll see a lot of big deals -- i was wrong. here we are. freeport mcmoran buying not one but two companies. the combined price if you add it all together gets close to $20 billion. that does include debt. let's go through some of the details. it's somewhat complex. let's start with bigger of the two deals. freeport's purchase of plains. approximately $6.9 billion in total now. it's a cash and stock deal. .6531 shares and 39 bucks a share in cash. that adds up to $50
to the fiscal cliff, this threatening of our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk or economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> so here's my sense, congressman mccarthy. why in the minds of republicans aren't they processing it this way? look, president, we'll give you what you want on rates. let them go up. but we have to get something in return. big cuts in the medicare program, and we're willing to make a deal is. that essentially the thinking of speaker boehner at this point? >> the president wants the rates to go up, that doesn't solve the problem and we don't want to be back here in another year or 10 years answering the same question. but right after the election, we sent a plan to the president where we gave revenues but looking for spending cuts. and he took three weeks to come back to us. he has gone on still on the campaign trail, still working through. but you have
stop the generation of jobs in this economy. >> there's a great article today in one of the papers about how apartment building, we have a shortage of apartments and shortage of housing and shortage of autos and shortage of office buildings developing, shortage of shopping centers, shortage of shopping malls. this is what begins a movement. you have to hire eventually. now you could say people are not looking for work, come on. look, jobs are here. they can -- it can be just easily reversed if you have no idea what is the future because of washington. >> given the data points that we've had in terms of claims numbers that did reflect an impact from sandy, they said 85,000 jobs or 86,000 jobs were sliced because of impact of sandy. average hours worked unchanged. doesn't that -- i don't know -- doesn't that bring into question a little bit the participation in the survey. how can it have no impact whatsoever? it seems curious to me. >> it does call into question whether these numbers can be accurate. we have been starting to think let's check accuracy. why isn't this done by s.a.p.?
the economy is pretty well positioned potentially in 2013 if we can put this behind us. so i think a lot of what's going on is what you would expect to see in this negotiation, very public negotiation, which is not the best way to do it. i think at some point, the president and the speaker are going to get in a room and have some very serious dialogue as this gets closer. my view is that both the administration and the republicans would prefer to put a deal together, and the outlines of that are on the table. >> you talk about the cliff or the abyss? we need to separate the two. it would be nice to have like a bridge to that $4 trillion deal that includes entitlement, tax reform. in fact, i don't know why the president isn't talking about that more with the simpson-bowles. >> the president did say that he doesn't think there's anything we can get done. >> as a bridge to that. always talking about the high end. >> actually, joe, i think the administration wants to see a deal come together here. >> for what, the fiscal cliff or the fiscal abyss? >> for both. >> for both. >> so that a down
a very fragile economy and an emerging and helpful nation and you can't tax your way out of this baby. this is impossible. and when these people zero in-- as erskine said they zero in on taxes, taxes, taxes, we said you've got revenue one to four, three times spending cuts versus one of revenue, but you go into the code and like this one, you go to home mortgage interest deduction and the housing industry guys, all the lobbyists go nuts. we said, look, we're not going to take it away from you but it doesn't need to be a million buck on a second home. we said take it to 500,000, give everybody a 12.5% nonrefundable tax credit which helps the little guy. and they go, "oh, yeah, i guess that might work." everybody is in the game. this will be savagery, full-page ads, ladies, old charge, veterans, simpson-bowles are doing their tricks out there. hang on tight. it's going to be a real, real struggle. >> schieffer: let me just ask you, you caught a lot of people's attention, including ourselves last week, when you did this video on internet to try to get young people-- >> eskind, will you q
. >> and some people fear going off of the cliff could cost thousands of jobs and push our fragile economy back in recession. it seems like we have been down this road before. that deal according to the president and congressional republicans is far from a sure thing. the president said it was a so-called balanced approach to solve this crisis and what he proposed this week was a classic bait and switch on the american people. >> it is unacceptable for republicans to hold middle class tax hostage because they refuse to let them go up on the wealthiest americans. >> people saying that the deal he offered doesn't look like a deal. steve is live in the washington bureau. is there any movement on either side. >> not much. a few republicans who are willing to talk about higher tax rev news but not higher tax rates. the president made a direct appeal to the public. the toy factory in pin pen. he urged congress to pass a bill and extend the era tax cuts for middle class only. >> congress could prevent a tax hike on the first 250,000, of everybodiy income. that means 98 percent of americans and nen per
to inject money in a credit fashion into their economy. and we certainly think we can bring our fixed income expertise and continue to help them. >> that would make sense for cantor. ireland was the mf-will first they were in trouble, then the model for the world. what got them into trouble again, housing or real estate or something or bad banks or -- and now again they're kind of a model for everyone on how to handle it. is that basically the last five years? >> absolutely. certainly was a real estate bubble there. now there are austerity measures being put in place and they're actually following through on the austerity measures. so certainly they'll come out first and actually look pretty good. >> so where is the most business for you for cantor in ireland, what will you be doing? >> certainly it's an equity based firm. we'll bring our fixed income expertise, probably become the primary dealer there. the irish government will continue to have to have bond issuances as well as corporate debt will start to become a much bigger part of their economy. >> who else looked at this firm, do you k
back this morning, a new report finds that exporting nat gas will actually help the u.s. economy, but not every day is a winner. >>> vice chairman alan blinder will tell us what he thinks. >>> a new study from the federal government shows exporting u.s. natural gas overseas has the potential to reshape the global energy markets. the obama administration has said the study will be central to the decision on whether to export. he said exporting the gas would be a bigger impact on the economy. >> slap in the face of dow chemical. of coke, not coke the beverage company. but this was something that was hotly disputed within the romney campaign. he really let this stuff go because the romney campaign had some very big givers that were chemical companies. >> do we know, say, very bad, how much will prices conceivableably go up if we become an exporter of natural gas? is it that great a difference? >> we burn offer more natural gas than we use. burn off, in other words literally, you see those flames, we flare more than we use. so we got a real excess of this stuff. >> the government say
cliff? are you expecting the economy to go over the fiscal cliff and see these taxes go high hadder and spending cuts take effect? >> my personal view is i'm still optimistic. i think the conversation has been constructive since. do we have a solution on the table yet? no. but i'm optimistic we'll get to a framework. >> why? >> there's been enough dialogue. there's been movement. everyone seems to recognize the problem. everybody realizes there has to be a revenue component, spend component, entitlement reform component. for us, the business community and all the ceos, certainty is the greatest stimulus for us. >> do you support tax rates going higher? >> me personally, as an individual, more importantly the business community, which i'm part of. we support something inclusive. if rates were higher in a videocasset vacuum, i'm not sure we'd be supportive of that. we have to make sure the consumers, those who spends a lot of the dollars, the middle class, are protected in this exercise. >> i guess the question i'm really getting at is, do you get the revenue from tax increases or fro
think everyone realizes how important it is. our economy is moving up some, not fast enough but, some, and to go over the cliff would be terrible. i think we will get an agreement. and, the reason i think we'll get an agreement, what is standing in the way, is revenues, particularly making that top rate go up to 39-6 but i think we are seeing real progress in that regard in two days. first, a good number of republican conservatives, people like coulter and bill kristol said we have to do it and, tom coburn says, in terms of the deduction and, mitt romney and the republicans and head of fedex and at&t saying, let it happen. so i think that is likely to happen. the president won the election on that issue and i think you'll see our republican colleagues reluctantly say, okay. let's go up to 39.6. >> chris: senator, let me interrupt right there and bring in senator corker. senator schumer is exactly right. a growing number of republicans and conservative, not a majority but a growing number are saying, look, we have to cave on tax -- raising tax rates, not just the idea of closing loopho
, in order to protect small businesses and our economy. instead, new revenue would be generated through progrowth tax reform that closes special interest loopholes and deduksz while lowering rates. i'm going to guess that is the very line that the white house is going to say no deal to, right? >> so let me understand. if, in fact, we want $800 billion in new revenues, and we can do that through closing loopholes, limiting deductions for the wealthy in this country, and we're going to not have a deal because it's not a rate increase, but rather taking the same amount of money from the same people and we're going to say no to that? >> well, there are people who said, the math doesn't work out. closing the loopholes doesn't get you enough money. >> soledad, i've been studying this for seven years. that's bologna. there's -- it's easy to get $800 billion out of the wealthy in this country by limiting deductions and taking away options that are specifically benefiting only the well off in this country. >> case, but -- >> all you have to do is -- for example, people making more than $250,000
not interfere with the economy the way it was beginning to. oil stepped back about one and three-quarters percent today closing at $86.38. liz: the ecb cutting at least the rate forecast of growth and so, nonetheless, that didn't help the picture, but the tech sector rallying today. as we mentioned, apple helping to push the rebounded after yesterday's steep drop. it hit a four-year low yesterday. let's look at iyw, apple makes up more than 22% of this etf which also holds tech heavyweights ibm and microsoft, three-quarters of a percent gain, and then the tech etf xlk also rose today. the fund's very large holding is, of course, apple. >>> we've got two ceos coming up that you are going to want to listen to. tom is the ceo of tmx group. it owns and operates the toronto stock exchange to our neighbors in the north, here in studio talking about the changing landscape for exchanges. the possibility of more acquisitions to come. david: and we're also going to be talking with the ceo and president of choice hotels, this is steve joyce. steve is going to be talking about their expansio
. but the jobs numbers suggest that the economy is doing well and it cuts against the republican argument that raising taxes on the rich with would hurt the economy and the economy is fragile. the numbers though that the economy is not fragile and that would improve the economy's leverage. he's still doing so many public events. he is trying to use that public pressure to sort of force the republicans to cut a deal. >> doing this public stuff but at the same time having these private talks with the speaker and david axelrod talked about what the president and speaker might be doing behind closed doors and the reasoning behind it. let's listen. >> both the president and the speaker are very fluent in the basic numbers. they have been living with them for some time now. so as i said, i don't think that there's a lot of mystery about this. the politics has to be traverse. they've got to get through the rocky shoals of grover norquist. >> does that make it easier to keep politics out of it? >> i think it helps for the two men to make a deal that might work for all sides. i sound like i'm a br
the economy is going to be hurt and i think both sides, especially the president deserve blame. stuart: who will get the blame? >> the republicans clearly are going to get the blame and hurting themselves. stuart: but we may go into a much slower economy and hurts the president. >> bad news for the president and even worse news for the the american people. stuart: i agree with that. all right, doug, not bad the at all. >> still a democrat. stuart: is that a tag line to every interview? >> it may well be. doug, thanks very much indeed. >> the so the president has made it very, very clear, drawn a line, no fiscal cliff deal without higher tax rates for the highest earningers, tax rates have got to go up. question, what will speaker boehner have to say about that? his reaction will be new at ten this morning. mark stein is going to be here as well and he'll join us to explore that and more. we have an oil and mining deal to tell, but. freeport mcmoran and copper and gold will have exploration and two separate deals for 9 billion in cash and stock. i'm not quite sure what all of that means. jus
this was for the economy. this is a multiyear low reading in the manufacturing numbers. we haven't seen a number like this since 2009. we haven't seen an employment index number like this since september of 2009, the last time it was at this level, unemployment, 9.8%. we have a nonfarm payrolls number coming out on friday. you'll be lucky to see a positive number in front of that. i don't see how the market overcomes that kind of thing. independent of all this jibber jabber over the fiscal cliff, the economy is in really rough shape now. >> it is. we're seeing businesses cut back, getting ready for the eventuality they see coming, no deal by december 31st this worsening. sam, how do you want to be invested in 2013? where is the growth in the economy coming from, if anywhere? >> i think the growth is coming from an improvement in the housing sector. i think we are starting to see a slowdown in the job loss from the government sector. so, i think we're going to be seeing a better than half speed recovery. so, you do want to be taking a balanced approach. we do favor the consumer discretionary at this p
't blow up the world economy for no good reason. it's taking the sharp knife covered in explosives away from a kid who has a lot of temper tantrums. it's a good thing to do. the white house calls it the mcconnell plan because it's based on an idea that mitch mcconnell proposed become in july 2011. but even though it is mitch mcconnell's idea, even though he came up with it, mitch mcconnell is not for it. mitch mcconnell at this point does not support the mcconnell plan at all. he didn't think democrats did either. and yesterday he wanted to call their bluff. now that is when c-span 2 suddenly became amazing television. yesterday afternoon mitch mcconnell asked the senate to move to an immediate vote on the mcconnell plan. vote on it now. you figured harry reid would back down. prove that even democrats don't like this idea. but reid did not back down. he doubled down. he said, yeah, let's vote on the plan. but let's move to an immediate up or down vote. no filibuster, no 60-vote requirement, let's see if it gets 51. if so, it's passed. at which point, mcconnell kind of filibustered his
of this country's economy. and actually, things are looking up, if you look at -- >> they're not saying that. >> -- the data. >> they're not saying that. i'm saying small business owners will be hurt. >> yeah. >> if you raise taxes. but -- we're talking about compromise. this is my view. you've got your view. you know what the answer is? >> yeah. >> getting together and talking saying, listen, this is what i can live with. you know what? 39.6% is offensive, even raising it 1 percentage point is offensive. why don't we do what warren buffett says and anybody that makes $1 million or more pays 30%, a minimum tax rate of 30%. and you raise the level up to $500,000 instead of $250,000 and i'll go ahead and reluctantly agree to raise the top rate to 37%. that's how deals are done, but you never get there if you don't have a president and congress -- >> but they can't do that now. >> why can't they do that? >> it's the centerpiece of their argument since the campaign and tim geithner on the sunday shows. they say there is no deal about raising taxes on the wealthy. >> and they're right. the matter
the economy does not recover. >> if they were rules people could apply and understand but will we have seen their role say we will do whatever we want to. zero been discretion to do whatever we want. we don't know what they will do. >> we will decide later. >> pretty much the subtext. john: good intentions and gone bad. might take on government gone wrong and a little bit gone wrong and a little bit of good news. and we can save you 10% on ground shipping over the ups store. look this isn't my first christmas. these deals all seem great at the time... but later... [ shirt ] merry christmas, everybody! not so much. ho ho ho! this isn't that kind of deal. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. >> show title tonight, good intentions gone wrong describes what government
to the economy. >> that's all the control they have left. they don't want to lose that in two years. back to the math to dig into this. they need, what? $900 billion -- >> a $1.1 trillion deficit, one $2 billion a year so debt does not grow a percent of gdp. >> how do we get there? the number on the table last week from the democrats on the entitlements was $400 billion. >> over ten years. >> that's nothing, nothing. >> letting the tax cuts expire, people earning over $250,000, that's $50 billion. >> how do you do this then? >> raising dividends, capital gains, state taxes, you need $800 billion more. the only way to get there is enormous spending cuts or e enormous tax increases. we raise $1.1 trillion a year. we need $900 billion to close the gap. that's an 80% across the board tax increase. >> is it realistic to close the gap? >> you can't let debt continue to grow forever. you have to step in the right direction, and this is a two prong negotiating strategy for democrats. get $150 # million a year from the wealthy, and then negotiate on the other $800 billion. you should recognize tha
of things are really getting better in the economy is food stamp use. food stamps are up to a record level. november showed 46 million people on food stamps. if things are getting better, how does that keep going up? >>guest: exactly. if you remember back during the campaign, obama was going around bragging saying, i saved detroit with the bailout. really? you saved detroit? is that why detroit is coming begging right now for money? it is insane. he is completely out of touch and he doesn't realize what this economy is like right now for every day folks. >>eric: thank you, michelle. >> there is supposed to be teaching for the kids but are they now towing the white house line? twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligatio. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, ri
nutritionally unfit to learn. the point about the economy, this is the short-sighted thinking so many people have about government expenditures, there is absolutely government waste, fraud, abuse, but when it comes to programs like this, you actually get a long-term and immediate benefit from that expenditure of taxpayer dollars. >> nobody can tell me this is a wasteful amount of food for an american. >> if i was on food stamps or s.n.a.p. program and i used my money, that dollar that i spend on my food actually comes -- recycles through the economy and produces $1.70 or more of a benefit to our gdp because you know what, people produce this food. the truckers depend on that. the store owners. it actually creates jobs in communities have millions of dollars of money that people are expending. >> what do you think about this, though, because there's another staggering statistic that 40% of all food supply in america each year is thrown away, discarded by americans, which works out to equivalent of $2,275 annually in food. it's a staggering amount of food tossed away. there is a real disconnec
's rate of unemployment stands at a four-year low. it is now 7.7% with the economy adding nearly 150,000 new jobs last month. the numbers issued by the labor department. a loss of manufacturing jobs did serve to dampen the outlook going forward. the manufacturing sector shed 7,000 jobs last month. the positive side, again, hurricane sandy appears not to have been the job killer many had feared. the labor department says the havoc wrought by sandy had no substantial impact on the unemployment picture. with us now, jill schlessinger, editor at la w manyre the jobs aart me ,ow m t are seasonal jobs? >> not so many seasonal. we saw some broad based gains and we continue to see some really robust gains in retail, in business services, health care is really continuing to show great improvement. you mentioned manufacturing. mentioned one other area, 20,000 jobs lost in construction. that may be a little bit of sandy related. >> but also, one of the interesting things, you looked at the numbers and said there was 300,000 people that said weather did affect the job surge. why is that not con
's going to have an impact on the economy? >> of course it is. it is-- well it's not the same as extending the bush tax cuts. it's part of the fiscal cliff, because just like all of these other things, stuart, people are trying to move income out of 2013, into 2012, which makes this year look a little bit better than it should, but what it means is that when we hit january 1st, 2013, the economy's going to collapse as far as i can tell. stuart: whoa, whoa, collapse is a strong word, art. >> collapse as low as we are, i agree. stuart: now, the obamacare tax change is a change in the tax rate. >> yes. stuart: that's something that the president's absolutely insisting on. he wants tax rates to go up for the top two income brackets and that's being forced by the republicans. they don't want the rate to go up. they'll pay more in overall revenue, but don't want the rate to go up. your comments please on the president's stand-fast position on raising tax rates? >> well, rates are where the real action is, i mean, if you broaden the base and lowered rates, tax revenues on the rich went up. you'd
on the debt. >>> all the numbers indicate that going off the fiscal cliff would hurt the u.s. economy in the short term. but could it be the best thing in the long run? going off that fiscal cliff. to this point most of the conversation has been focused on what happens in january, and for good reason. there's no deal in congress. tax rates go up for a lot of folks, all americans. and a $1.2 trillion worth of defense and spending cuts will be automatically enacted. excuse me, that fiscal cough i told you about. the alternative minimum tax kicks in and put it all together and the results are pretty. the economy would contract by half a percent in 2013. unemployment would raise to 9.1% and the economy would experience what cbo said would be judged as a recession. but after that, then things start to look pretty good. the cbo says after next year by the agency's estimates economic growth will pick up. the labor market will strengthen returning output to its potential level. 5.5% by 2018. essentially if no deal is struck, the federal government would be forced to do what it's refused to do
the fiscal cliff will not just impact the national economy but have a lot of impact on state and local economies, as well, and their state budgets, et cetera. the president, though, is standing firm. and jake carney saying unless the republicans give in on tax rates and raise the bush tax rates on the rich, there is no deal and the president is willing to go off the cliff. they hammered speaker boehner's proposal. >> we don't know who pays. we don't know what we are talking about in terms actual legislation to increase revenues it is magic beans and fairy dust. >>reporter: it doesn't sound like they are ready for a compromise. he said they do not take speaker boehner's proposal seriously enough to offer a counterpropsal so the white house believes the ball is still in the republicans' court. >>shepard: but speaker boehner has moved, if shiply and if for the first time in public but he has moved. >>reporter: he has. he is not willing yet, not yet, anyway, willing to raise tax rates. in speaker boehner's proposal he put revenue, tax revenue of $800 billion on the table. you her the white
to the united states economy. it's a recipe for a recession. and i certainly would not like to see the rhetoric that we saw from the treasury secretary tim geithner who said he's prepared to go over the fiscal cliff. that is not a good way to talk about what's going on right now. >> mr. reich, let me ask you the same thing. do you think there's code suggesting they are working towards something? because, doug, as you point out, the language was really harsh during this week. but all of a sudden, here we are friday evening and people are saying these kind of soft things that say maybe compromise. what do you think, robert? >> i think doug is right. it's too early to break out the champagne, but undoubtedly, the rhetoric is softening as we get closer and closer to the christmas holidays. these people want to go home. they want to have a holiday. they know that they cannot go home to their constituents and say essentially, i couldn't get anywhere. we're going to go over the fiscal cliff together. and that's particularly true and particularly difficult for republicans because the way the polls are
for the economy and you? we'll get the latest from our decisionmakers. our capitol hill roundtable. debbie stabenow. tom coburn and jeep hensarling. >>> we'll get the decisions with our roundtable. then, our powerhouse roundtable weighs in on that and all of the week's politics. tea party stalwart abandons. >> conservatives on the hill are counting on us. >>> and the supreme court court takes on gay marriage. we'll break it all down with george will, james carville and mary matalin. paul krugman of the "new york times" and abc's own matthew dowd . >>> hello, again, just over three weeks away from that fiscal cliff, we just come off a week of press conferences, symbolic votes in senate, but less than an hour of serious negotiating. what will it take to break the stalemate? we'll get into that this morning, with two big roundtables of elected officials and experts. let's begin with the lawmakers. senator tom coburn for the republicans and debbie stabenow for the democrats. and congressman hensarlingg. the president said that for there to be a big deal, tax rates on the wealthy are going to h
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